Skip to main content

About your Search

20121007
20121015
SHOW
Book TV 36
STATION
CSPAN2 36
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 6:45am EDT
thing is about education. very quickly, this is where we need to have a very deep discussion. there will be no democracy, no change over to work on education. i mean by education, education for all, education insulted to strike against poverty. it's jihad for education what you get something essential. this is what i'm saying about women. i was talking about the headscarf industry. i'm sorry, the only way you're going to evaluate and to assess empowerment of women, is on two things. has nothing to do with the way they dress. it has to do with access to education. and the second, access to the job market. this is where we want people to be. and the secular are not coming with answers and the islamists are not coming with answers that are credible and efficient on these things. this is a big question, what is your education policy. in of religion. and on this is going to be a big problem. we have big challenges. the divisions from within the literalists and the reformists and the rationalists, the division from within and the big divide between shiites and shira would be a big
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 10:45pm EDT
. minorities against their new homeland. the same war that makes the educated american man working 70 hours per week your in and year out to accomplish something in his five feel as if he is presented. a war of christian values have no place in this world. that no culture is better than any other. one set of values, one model worth. the war that encourages, foster's, harbors and empowers radical islam. more whose casualty will ultimately be the western world, marked by words. our war is with these people as much as it is it with those extremism from the events of september 11. america is the one hope for the world. the only shield, the only hedge of protection. the one bloodline to make sure that no enemy can cross. it has the model, the values, the culture, the freedom and constitution. america is a conservative idea in a sea of socialism. america's values are conservative. america favors the individual. e. pluribus unum. israel to palestine and christianity man with the rest of the world only the ex the government employee that was found on the opposite premise. the same conservative values a
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00pm EDT
of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restore the principles of the american founding. he is the intellectual muscle of that mission. he teaches in two of the programs. the program and the lincoln fellow program. most important, he is the editor of the claremont review books, the quarterly publication of the claremont institute. perhaps you are famili
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 10:00pm EDT
survived? how many did not? and for those who did, how did they obtained the decent education? how far did it take them? where they doing now? some i am sad to say never did recover from the battering they underwent with the schools 10 or two exceptions the worst i have seen anywhere in the united states. they and the streets where the needle drugs and crack cocaine almost everywhere. three of the voices that suffered the most are no longer a live. one of them by a new him when he was eight years old. he finally killed himself with a bullet to his brain in a moment of despair. another killed himself intentionally with inherit -- overdose of heroin. another died by surfing on a subway train. riding on the tops under the tunnels of york his friends were lying down flat. but in a moment of bravado as if to say nothing this city does to me can stop me now he lifted up his head and waved to his friends. this deal being struck his goal is body shuddered twice and was dead and not yet 14 at the time. those are only three kids that lost their lives that under the age. i mourned for them with their
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:45pm EDT
and father, months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill, georgia, and the surrounding areas, welcomed matthew home with tears, flags, and salutes. the streets were line for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service at the midwestist church that helped raced him. a local boy execute troop clenchinged pencils and papers and sent them to afghanistan. jim had a vision and the matthew freeman project began. he dedicated time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day, 2010. the project has sent over seven tons of supplies to our marines in afghanistan for human tear efforts. matthew's city, and our great arm would bases, and the savannah air guard, have helped me heal by supporting the math few freeway -- freeman project, and the 5k run for peace. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town, to captain matthew freeman joe jacket proudly announced the scholarship we're starting for the siblings of the fallen in combat. these are the forgotten mourners who sacrifice or
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
literary education colonial. in those early years he was certainly not a student of the boys lengths, houston or the harlem renaissance of the riding that would subsequently shape and professionally. perhaps it is his blindly cosmopolitan perspective on the united states and on its literature that gives him such a clear eye view of it. that may be too easy a formulation. in any case, suffice it to say that his work really is without compare. the word magisterial is often used in conjunction with biographies, so the effect of the word has diminished somewhat i want to restore. as i think -- as i can think of no better word than that to describe the march and authority of his four masterworks, the art and imagination of w. e. b. du bois, life of langston hughes, in two volumes, jackie robinson, a biography, and rob allison, a biography. the first volume of the hughes biography was the pulitzer prize. the ellison was a finalist for the national book award. in recognition of his contributions not only to african-american biography but also to the genre of biography itself he recently rec
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 3:00pm EDT
decided that i can take this opportunity to grow and i can take this opportunity to educate and learn. i assure you that the opportunity that unfolded on september 8, 2009. it forever changed my existence and life. just imagine in 24 years old on a construction site one day. you get a call in your cell phone. someone telling you that you will receive the medal of honor. you're an overnight sensation. let me tell you, don't envy me. talk about pressure and stress. that goes back to that day. i'm just going to tell you how i really feel. i look at everything. the president called me, it all started off, he called me on my cell phone. and he said you know what, dakota, you are getting ready to receive the medal of honor. we need to start planning for it. if planning her wedding is like planning for the medal of honor ceremony, i'm out on the wedding. [laughter] i told him, you know, i said i don't want the medal, i don't feel like i deserved it. i started bargaining with him. i said he could give me a navy cross, and that we had to back and fight. so he said that's not what happened. the pr
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
for. she was writing to kind of educate young people on the politics and the social situation of her time. this is middle-class i guess but before the publication of uncle tom's cabin they were living off of calvin salary which really wasn't very much. after the publication of uncle tom's cabin she became a sensation, the most famous author of america and in the world. she did a tour of great britain part no i mean this novel brought her great things and with the came considerable prosperity though there would have been more if she had negotiated a better contract with her publishers etc., etc. but she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of uncle tom's cabin. after that she had written sketches for the magazine but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote several and all of them were income generating novels. she was a housewife and didn't have much of an income but she became prosperous and her house, her real house, she might say the house that she built in hartford connecticut is basically a testament to her prosperity that came after the
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 3:00pm EDT
that makes the white middle class educated american guy, working 70 hours a week, week in, week out, year in, year out, who has accomplished something in his life, feel as if he is resented. it's a war that says our christian values have no place in this world. it is a wall that says no culture is better than any other. no one set of values, no one model worth aspiring to. it is a war that encourages, fosters, harbors, and empowers, radical islam. it is a war whose casualty will ultimately be the western world. mark my words. our war is with these people as much as it is with those whose extremism authored the events of september 11th. america is the one hope for the world. the only shield. the only hedge of protection. the one bloodline that we must make sure together no enemy can cross. it has the model. it has the values. it has the culture. it has the freedom, and it has the constitution. see, america is a conservative idea in a sea of socialism. american values are conservative values. america favors the individual to the collective. patriotism to radical multiculturalism. israel to pal
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
of education. the brown case had been argued before the court prior to warren's arrival and held over the previous term. it is impossible to know, i think, any fair estimation has to admit that it's impossible to know precisely how the court would have ruled under warren's predecessor. but notes from the conference under chief justice fred vincent, his predecessor, suggest that at best the court would have struck school segregation by a vote of 6-3 with vincent dissenting. at worst, it is possible that it might have gone 5-4 to uphold segregation. the latter would have been a catastrophe for race relations, but even a split vote striking school segregation could have been calamitous. it would have 'em boldened segregationists to find support for their institutions in the supreme court, particularly by its chief justice. the job confronting warren in his first term then was nothing less than a defining test of american race relations. as warren took over brown, i think it mattered that he came from neither north, nor south, but he was a westerner, and as such, somewhat less invested in
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:15am EDT
who get out, have enough of them that they are educating us about the truth of life in north korea. there've been several books published and we now have a much better picture of what the truth of the existence is there. but the north korean refugees are performing a second equally important function. i do believe more important. they are hoping their own information starved homeland, just as the world now knows more about north koreans, north koreans still far more about the period. this is to thanks to the efforts of north koreans who have escaped. how did they do that? think a minute. an immigrant. with the first thing he wants to do? he wants to let his family back home know he's okay and tell them about his new life. before a north korean who wants to do that, it's next to impossible. you can't make a phone call to north korea. you can't send an e-mail or text message or facebook and you can't even mail a letter. so the exiles have created a black market in information. they hire chinese careerist across the border and deliver messages, or sometimes they deliver chinese cellph
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle of higher education that all four and a quote argued fiercely with america's tendency toward a progressive triumphal sunny sense of history and all four his quote continues demanded americans try to see through their well practiced and comfortable myths about the civil war and develop a genuine and authentically tragic sense of history. blight's mackiel critic carol phillips said of the book and i quote it effortlessly seems together literary analysis biography and historical thinking and in a thoughtful and appreciative review in the new york review of looks andrew del benko causes suggested. one of our most noted and lauded historians, david blight is the class of 1954 professor of american history and director of the guilford lehrman. is held fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical so
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
now have formed a large -- there are a enough of them. they are educating us about the truth of life in north korea. and there have, several books published about life in north korea, and we now have a much better picture what the truth of the existence is there. but the north korea refugees are performing a second equally important function. arguably even more important. they are helping to open up their own information starved homeland. just as the world now knows about north korea. north koreans know far more about the world. this too is thanks to the earths of yort koreas who have escaped. how do they do that? think a minute. any immigrant who goes to a new country, what's the first thing they want to do? he wants to let his family back home know he's okay. and them about his new life. but for north koreas who wants to the do that it's next to impossible up. you can't make a phone call to north korea. you can't an e-mail or text message or facebook. you can't even mail a letter. so the exiles have created a black market in information. they hire chinese couriers to cross the bord
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00am EDT
. and the role of women in society was changing rapidly. my friends, educator with traditional values but a deep sense of personal ambition, wanted to know how to be true to ourselves, yet remain committed to our husbands and our children. as a young mother i had stumbled into a bookstore and told gift from the sea off of the bargain shelf. it's author was struggling with the very same questions that we were asking ourselves. her answers were deceptively simple, and yet they ring true. and i wanted to know how this woman got so smart. and so, rising before dawn, i climbed the stairs to my third floor room. yes, dear virginia, a room of my own, to read lindbergh's work, to study its historical framework, and to jot down my thoughts before sending my children off to school. my biography of and lindbergh would take more than 10 years to complete. during which i had the rare privilege of meeting her. 10 times. but the book was more than a biography. it was a journey towards self-knowledge, during which i developed a consuming interest in understanding the lives of women. not only women thinkers, but
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00pm EDT
history. and so in 2002i contacted a friend of mine who happens to the minister of higher education he was in academia, and when traveling to syria for years amid a lack of teeth of a lot of academics. he brought a lot of these people into government. that was a good or bad thing. many people saw it as a sign of academics and maybe even take the country in a different direction. so i contacted the minister of higher education and the contacted bashar. two years almost to the day later the ambassador to the united states called me up and was also a friend and also an academic. dean of computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said, it's on. and i had forgotten about this whole thing. and i said, what's on? and the set to well, the president wants to meet with you and so common with him in may and june of that year extensively, it's viewed his wife and many other syrian officials. >> what was the first meeting like? >> well, after the pleasantries in after i explained why i wanted to do this my first substantive sentence to him was, mr. president, you know
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 2:00pm EDT
contacted a friend of mine, who happens to be the minister of education and he was in academia and the traveling to syria for years i met a lot of academics. being an academic myself. and bashar but a lot of these people into government. i don't know about academics being a government, but many people felt that the time that bringing academic technocrats, that maybe he would take the country in a different direction. so i contacted the minister for education and he contacted bashar. two years almost to the day later, the ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my fi
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 12:00pm EDT
and her outfits and her accent and her education. her children and her makeup. for a group of folks that have tried so hard to eliminate sexism from the national discourse, they sure know how to use it when they need to, don't they? is the same with ann coulter. she's attacked for her looks and her hair in her way. since we are talking about weight, to notice the remarkable improvement over the years in the physical charms of women in the political ground. consider for a moment one of the first feminists to emerge in the early 1960s. now, fast-forward to 2012, a conservative writer, a quite a difference, wouldn't you say? the sudden ascension of sarah palin, until you consider that she was the enormously popular sitting governor here in america, when it comes to barack obama, even with a double large on, his words could barely take a page. [applause] my crackerjack research team got their hands just on that document read on barack obama's resume back in 2007 is looking to ditch his senate dagan move up. let me read a little bit for you. objective, leader of the free world. experienc
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:45am EDT
establish for two reasons. one is because there is a need for education in tennessee and the answer is that there is a memorial in the fat. so howard is says to sentiments together and forming this university and served as president in 1890s. this is an oddball peas because it's signed by jefferson davis, the higher theoretically if that actually would be shooting against a few years time. jefferson davis was of course secretary of war for the civil war and this is commissioned a second lieutenant. after he graduated from bowdoin, went to west point and was a commissioner commissioned officer after three years of being there. jefferson davis was an honorary recipient after the civil war. howard was appointed commissioner of the freedman's bureau. here is a letter from mary showed kerry, who was a black woven who is writing to howard, while howard is at this time president of howard university. he held both positions in the late 60s, early 70s. he had been a founding author of howard university. he and a group of others that a congregation of said about the civil war determining how
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am EDT
per employee i think would be one. education would be the second, and i think it particular on the job training has been my own experience, and innovation being the third. the more that you have the faster the economy will grow, the higher the incomes will be. another way to think about it is how much equity you have or that you at least think you have come and go willingness to take risk, put that equity at risk. and in 2007 and believe you have a lot of equity and willing to assume a lot of your income, willing to make risky investments in innovation, rather than working capital respond to growth in the economy, those things drive the economy, but after the crisis when real estate prices dropped 30% eagerly give a lot less equity, probably to have a lot less than you realize so you rein in risk-taking and economic activity contracts to just forgive a equity you have. you start saving instead of consuming to build back your equity reserve, and you start dialing down economic activity to compensate for the less equity you have. you feel less comfortable taking this. i think that's on a
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00am EDT
to have very successful careers afterwards. but we were the good girls. so we were highly educated, mostly white middle-class girls who were told in college that we were very smart and we are very competent, but the word career in the '60s was hardly ever mentioned. some women went on to navy medical school or law school but most women were expected to have a job until they get married and have children. we came to "newsweek" thinking that this is a fabulous, and it was, a very glamorous job to have in those days. we started as actually women were hired on a male desk to deliver the mail. and you graduated to clipper where you clicked newspapers and deliver them to the riders. if you are really good you got to be a researcher. that was a real exciting job because, in fact, you worked on the stories of the week that were breaking news. you worked with writers, reporters, the editors. and those of us who work in the sections in the back of the magazine, from medicine or the arts or lifestyle or religion, did a lot of reporting as did the women in the business section because new york was the
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 1:45pm EDT
of issue. and every one of them has examples of that. at one time education was really considered more a woman's issue in the state legislature until in the 80's began connecting it to economic development. once it became an economic development issue than it is no longer woman's issue because it takes care of the children. this is not everybody's issue. >> is one thing million people need to understand. for us, for our generation women and also many, many men, feminist was a positive word, a good thing. very good thing. and so you have these women who embraced feminism, think it's a good thing and have now discovered that it is not working anymore and there are -- the women i teach don't want to be identified. the last thing they want to be identified with. and u.s. tim, do you believe in this, this, this. they say, yes to yes, yes. well, you know, your a feminist. the label is a problem. many women don't want to use the label, don't want to send signals that are associated with the label because they know their is a group of voters out there who don't see it the way it our generation
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 7:00pm EDT
college-educated suburban people who said this is intolerable, we want action, and literally within six or seven months the environmental protection agency was established by richard nixon who was no tree hugging environmentalists let me tell you. there were seven or eight major pieces of legislation that passed the clean water act and safe drinking water act and so on. a tremendous change. and this was done in response to public pressure. public pressure exhibited by people going out in the streets taking part in demonstrations. next one is the march on washington. we just slipped by the 49th anniversary of the march on washington which on august 28th 1963i was there. it was a festival of democracy and unbelievable moment of shining idealism in america that america's dream of participation in equality for all could actually be realized. i had come from the south and i had seen a kid sitting at the lunch counters and i would walk with the kids and birmingham when they unleashed the police dogs and turned the fire hoses on the demonstrators and i saw martin luther king get arrested and t
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
" is also a great children's story that is who she was writing for. she was ready to kind of educate young people on the politics and social situation of her time. she's kind of middle-class i guess. before the publication of "uncle tom's cabin," they were living off calvin salary, which wasn't very much. after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin" she became a sensation, the most famous soccer in america, if not the world because this novel brought her great things and with it came considerable prosperity, but would've been more if she had negotiated a better contract with her publisher, et cetera, et cetera. but she continued to write and she broke prolifically after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." before that novel she had mostly just written sketches for this magazine from a site that. but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote several unobvious or income generating novels. so she was a woman and a housewife who did not much of an m. but after "uncle tom's cabin" she became prosperous warehouse, to how she didn't rents come up with a house that she built over in ha
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
for an appointment. it happened to be a nonpaying appointment to a board of education to a campaign contributor. he received nothing personally and demand in return got a state position that he held before under republicans. before that, don siegelman was prosecuted for bribery and was convicted in a research seven-month. he was out on appeal in that he's going back for nearly seven years. this is something george w. bush did with more than 100 appointees is a commonplace. the prettiest part of our system, but as a commonplace to become an ambassador. bush did it with over 100 of his appointees. of course he was not prosecuted, but he was in a maximum-security prison. he was at the democratic national convention and now two days ago he's gone off to jail. the other thing that is part of the u.s. attorney scandal, we see again in this election. the u.s. attorney by the name of david ecclesia said new mexico lasses job. in 2004, he was passed by rove with prosecuting what rove cause voter fraud. and to find people fraudulently registered to vote. he investigated for several instead it's not happening
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:15am EDT
all the happy memories and one of the things that i -- is my father taught me to value education. he was such a tirade about it and he often threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do well in school. >> with the is a scary threat? >> that was a scary threat because i believed him. i didn't want to go back to mexico and i wanted to make him proud. another thing i felt, i felt that i owed him that. i never wanted my father to say i shouldn't have brought you and it was bad but really like always was motivating me to do well in school and to do all these great things that he wanted me to do. i didn't want to hear that ever from my dad. he never said that he didn't but my dad, and i was writing the book i really wanted to make sure that he didn't come across as the villain in the story. i really wanted to give him his humanity. he has had some really great things. he was dealing with a lot of difficulties that affected our relationship. >> you tell a story here about how you wanted to go to church one sunday and he held up a budweiser and he said, this is my god. >> yes, yes. >>
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
education, and he was such a tyrant about it, and he threatened to send me back to mexico if i didn't do good in school. >> host: was that scary? >> guest: i really believed him. i thought he would do it. >> host: you didn't want to go back? >> guest: i didn't want to go back, and i wanted to make him proud. another thing was because i begged him to bring me, i felt i owed him that. i nevermented my father to say i shouldn't -- never wanted my father to say i shouldn't have brought you. it was always motivating me to do well in school, to do all great things he wanted me to do because i didn't want to hear that ever from my dad, and he never said that to me. he didn't. yeah, my dad -- and as i was writing the book, i really wanted to make sure that he didn't come across as the villain in the story. you know, i really wanted to give him his humanity because he had some really great things, my dad, but he was also dealing with a lot of difficulties that up fortunately affected our relationship. >> host: you tell the story in here how you wanted to go to church sunday, and he held up a budw
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00am EDT
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 5:00pm EDT
. very good for my education i was on the screen for about 15 seconds, and it took about half a day of filming. and that is not including the time that i spent in costume and makeup. it is the effort that goes in to making movies on television, it is just terrific. i was walking around the set and i saw a weaving -- and they had just put this prop -- it didn't appear in the story, but it was a 12th century boom. now, looms changed century by century and it was a technology that developed. it was not a 10th or 11th century loom. it was a 12th century one. but somebody working on a film knew it. and they got it exactly right. >> are you tempted be in any one of these things? >> well, i like the drama. [laughter] >> you know, it was a privilege to work with eddie vedder, one of the stars. i learned, for example, that you can't act if you're trying to remember your lines because then you say your lines with a book on your face and then what comes next? if you're actually going to act in a 152nd rule, you have to know your lines altogether. so i learned a lot. but no, i am not tempted to
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00pm EDT
manifesto, which is the protest of the supreme court decision in the brown versus board of education decision in 1954. strom thurmond is the recordholder to this day of the longest one-man filibuster in the "guinness book of world records," "guinness book of world records," 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was one of the last jim crow demagogues but what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. now what do i mean by that? what is a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it was one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics and that is the flow of jobs and industry, for resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding for the federal government to build military installations at a t
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 10:30am EDT
court's decision to brown v. board of education decision in 1954. strom thurmond is the recordholder to this day the longest one-man filibuster. it's in the guinness book of world records. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurman today as one of the last digit growth demagogues. anyways. but what we forget is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. now what do i mean by that? now, the sun belt is one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, industries, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. you know, something stays for recruiting industries, passing right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding for the federal government to build military licenses at the time the united states is involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona and north carolina are al
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45am EDT
kind of issue. and every one of them has examples of that. if you stop and think of one time, education was considered more a women's issue with the state legislature until in the 80s we began connecting to economic development. a month they became an economic development issue, that is still ugly woman's issue because she takes care of the children. this is now everybody's issue. >> is one thing that younger people in the audience seemed to understand. for us, for our generation, women and also many, many men, it was a good thing, very good thing. so you've got these women who embrace feminism and it is a good thing in about discovered it's it's not working anymore. the women i teach don't want to be identified as feminists. it's the last thing they want to be identified with. you asked them, do you believe in this? to believe in this? and they say yes, yes you guessed it and then i go, here are feminist. the label is a positive. so you have many women not wanting to use the label, with not wanting to send signals associated because they know there is a group of voters out there who do
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 2:30am EDT
than is educational. it's one thing that genre can add to actual history. >> what is your day job? >> i teach at george washington university. >> talking here with thomas mallon.
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)